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21/01/2019

PPF,Developing students’ 21st century skills, including creativity, critical thinking, and problem solving, has been a prevailing concern in our globalized and hyper-connected society.

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Jeannette Wing’s influential article on computational thinking 6 years ago argued for adding this new competency to every child’s analytical ability as a vital ingredient of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning. What is computational thinking? Why did this article resonate with so many and serve as a rallying cry for educators, education researchers, and policy makers? How have they interpreted Wing’s definition, and what advances have been made since Wing’s article was published? This article frames the current state of discourse on computational thinking in K–12 education by examining mostly recently published academic literature that uses Wing’s article as a springboard, identifies gaps in research, and articulates priorities for future inquiries.

Jeannette M. Wing, née le 4 décembre 1956, est professeur d'informatique à l'Université Carnegie-Mellon. Elle est directrice du département d'informatique. Elle a reçu son Bachelor et son Master au Massachusetts Institute of Technology en 1979, puis son PhD en 1983, toujours au MIT. Wikipédia

Computational thinking and media & information literacy: An integrated approach to teaching twenty-first century skills

Abstract

Developing students’ 21st century skills, including creativity, critical thinking, and problem solving, has been a prevailing concern in our globalized and hyper-connected society. One of the key components for students to accomplish this is to take part in today’s participatory culture, which involves becoming creators of knowledge rather than being passive consumers of information. The advancement and accessibility of computing technologies has the potential to engage students in this process. Drawing from the recent publication of two educational frameworks in the fields of computational thinking and media & information literacy and from their practical applications, this article proposes an integrated approach to develop students’ 21st century skills that supports educators’ integration of 21st century skills in the classroom.

Computational Thinking.pdf

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Keywords

Computational thinking Consilience Media & information literacy Participatory culture Scratch Twenty-first century skills 

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