Avertir le modérateur

06/12/2019

OneNetwork.Infinite,MyNewsSRU,DigitalWorkplace,Bringing it All Together,Learn, Meet, Discover, Exchange, Collaborate, Connect, Anywhere, Anytime, Any device, the people..by the people,everything,WelcomToMyWorld,Know why, Know who, Know where, Know what.

SRU-Electronics" is an impressive research portal that also provides an interactive component that draws from both social media and knowledge management processes."

MyNewsSRU,DigitalWorkplace,Bringing it All Together,Transformation Strategy Pyramid is a tool I have used over the last ten years to structure thoughts and guidance for my clients For Transformation initiatives,News,Media & Press,KM,IE,Blogs,Events,Google

Learn, Meet, Discover, Exchange, Collaborate, Connect, Anywhere, Anytime, Any device, the people..by the people, everything

We’re getting a lot of requests for the video link to “Say Everything”. This is the first song on our latest album release, New Folk.

https://youtu.be/E1xKUw8D1qQ

Dans le monde avec ''MyNewsCenterNavigator''

Our events provide you with laser focused content, unique experiences, access to people & ideas that create innovation, relevant connections, & generate business.

Success is a great feeling. So what’s needed for your users to succeed when doing research? It’s about finding the most relevant results in the library collections, the ability to easily cite resources, or to get search suggestions at the right time. 

983816239.gif

WelcomToMyWorld

The Grid,a member-based partnership network for urban tech community. The goal of the network is to link organizations, academia and local tech leaders in order to promote collaboration and the sharing of knowledge and resources.

In addition to connecting member companies and talent, The Grid will host various events, educational programs and co-innovation projects, while hopefully improving access to investors as well as pilot program opportunities. The Grid is launching with more than 70 member organizations — approved through an application and screening process — across various stages and sectors.

Your Digital Workplace,

Successful Digital Workplace

Images SRU-Electronics International Research

Images 21CenturyWebArchive

Images StefanV.Raducanu,A Day in the Life

Images A Day in the World of FranceWebAsso

Images About SRU-Electronics

Images Bonjour Stefan de FranceWeb

Images Catégories FranceWeb

Images FranceWeb sur Facebook

Images FranceWeb, e-GlobalNetWork

Images FranceWebAgency

Images FranceWebAsso

Images FranceWebAssociation

Images FranceWebAsso,Yvelines

Images FranceWebAsso,Faisons connaissance

Images FranceWebNews

Images MyNewsCenterNavigator

Images FranceWebAsso,Networking

Images FranceWebAsso,NEWS CENTER

Images FranceWebAsso,OneGlobalLocal

Images FranceWebAsso,PoissyVilleConnectée

Images PoissyVilleConnectée

Images RaducanuBestWebCollection

Images SRU-Electronics

Images sruelectronics

Images Stefand'Internet

Images Dipl.Ing.Stefan V.Raducanu

Images PoissySmartCity

3ARWD1.GIF"MyNewsCenterNavigator,"e veux un robot pour chaque personne."

MyNewsCenterNavigator, Anywhere, Anytime, Anydevice, Easy to use, Easy to Install, Easy to Learn,Put the World's News at your fingertips 24 hours a day,Your instant Connexion to Local, National and World News,One Planet. 1agld1r.gifOneNetwork.Infinite possibilities

28/11/2019

12th European Space Conference - Registrations are open

SRU-Electronics" is an impressive research portal that also provides an interactive component that draws from both social media and knowledge management processes."

Learn, Meet, Discover, Exchange, Collaborate, Connect, Anywhere, Anytime, Any device, the people..by the people, everything

Our events provide you with laser focused content, unique experiences, access to people & ideas that create innovation, relevant connections, & generate business.

Success is a great feeling. So what’s needed for your users to succeed when doing research? It’s about finding the most relevant results in the library collections, the ability to easily cite resources, or to get search suggestions at the right time.

 
12th EU Space Conference <spaceconference_mailing@jk-events.com>
À :stefanraducanu@yahoo.fr
 
28 nov. à 11:58
 
 
 
12th European Space Conference - New Decade, Global Ambitions: Growth, Climate, Security & Defence - Brussels - Egmont Palace - 21 & 22 January 2020
 
Register in 2019 and get your Early Bird discount
 
The 12th European Space Conference

Will be a defining event as it will serve to set the scene for the upcoming decade with regards not only to European space Policy it self, but also to many space-related issues, such as "new space", industrial strategy, research & development, AI and quantum, digital security, and defence.

This next edition of our cycle of conferences will count on the presence of the new European decision makers who will be at the helm of this policy for at least the next mandate, and possibly longer. Key areas of interest and debate will be:

  • New framework for European space: launch services, future EU industrial policy
  • R&D and driving innovation, New Space, downstream industry
  • Space and the European Green Deal
  • European strategic autonomy, data security, Cloud and Cybersecurity
  • Space Traffic Management, SST/SSA
  • International cooperation in the space domain
  • Space and defence: new challenges, and the role of space in EU defence initiatives
  • 5G and challenges to telecommunication
 

Among the High level European invited guests*

 
Charles














                                                                                        Michel
Charles Michel

President elect

European Council

David














                                                                                        Maria














                                                                                        Sassoli
David Maria Sassoli

President

European Parliament

Ursula














                                                                                        Von














                                                                                        Der Leyen
Ursula von der Leyen

President elect

European Commission

Etienne














                                                                                        Schneider
Etienne Schneider

Deputy Prime Minister, Minister for Economy & Health

Luxembourg

Karel


                                                                                        Havlicek
Karel Havliček

Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of Industry & Trade

Czech Republic

Frédérique





                                                                                        Vidal
Frédérique Vidal

Minister for Higher Education, Research & Innovation

France

Manuel



                                                                                        Heitor
Manuel Heitor

Minister for Science, Technology & Innovation

Portugal

Annegret

                                                                                        Kramp-Karrenbauer
Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer

Defence Minister

Germany

Florence

                                                                                        Parly
Florence Parly

Minister for Armed Forces

France

Lorenzo

                                                                                        Guerini
Lorenzo Guerini

Defence Minister

Italy

Thomas

                                                                                        Jarzombek
Thomas Jarzombek

Federal Government Coordinator for Aerospace, Commissioner of the BMWi for the Digital Economy

Germany

Margrethe

                                                                                        Vestager
Margrethe Vestager

Executive Vice-President Designate Europe Fit for Digital Age

European Commission

Frans

                                                                                        Timmermans
Frans Timmermans

Executive Vice-President Designate, European Green Deal

European Commission

Josep

                                                                                        Borrell
Josep Borrell

High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs & Security, Vice-President Designate

European Commission

Maroš Šefcovic
Maroš Šefčovič

Vice-President Designate, Interinstitutional Relations & Foresight

European Commission

Thierry

                                                                                        Breton
Thierry Breton

Commissioner Designate for Internal Market, Industry (inc. Space & Defence) & Digital

European Commission

Mariya

                                                                                        Gabriel
Mariya Gabriel

Commissioner Designate for Innovation, Research, Culture, Education and Youth

European Commission

Virginijus Sinkevicius
Virginijus Sinkevičius

Commissioner Designate for Environment, Oceans and Fisheries

European Commission

Johannes

                                                                                        Hahn
Johannes Hahn

Commissioner Designate for Budget

European Commission

Didier

                                                                                        Reynders
Didier Reynders

Commissioner Designate for Justice

European Commission

Jean-Eric

                                                                                        Paquet
Jean-Eric Paquet

Director- General DG RTD

European Commission

Roberto

                                                                                        Viola
Roberto Viola

Director-General DG CONNECT

European Commission

Pierre

                                                                                        Delsaux
Pierre Delsaux

Deputy Director-General DG GROW

European Commission

Adina

                                                                                        Ioana

                                                                                        Valean
Mattias Petschke

Director EU Satellite Navigation Programmes, DG GROW,

European Commission

Nathalie

                                                                                        Loiseau
Nathalie Loiseau

Chair of SEDE Committee

European Parliament

Marian

                                                                                        Jean

                                                                                        Marinescu
Marian Jean Marinescu

Member

European Parliament

Maria

                                                                                        Da

                                                                                        Graca Carvalho
Maria Da Graça Carvalho

Member

European Parliament

Eva

                                                                                        Kaili
Eva Kaili

Member

European Parliament

Isabel

                                                                                        Garcia

                                                                                        Munoz
Isabel Garcia Munoz

Member

European Parliament

Massimiliano

                                                                                        Salini
Massimiliano Salini

Member

European Parliament

Christian

                                                                                        Ehler
Christian Ehler

Member

European Parliament

Angelika

                                                                                        Niebler
Angelika Niebler

Member

European Parliament

Jerzy

                                                                                        Buzek
Jerzy Buzek

Member

European Parliament

Zdzislaw

                                                                                        Krasnodebski
Zdzislaw Krasnodębski

Member

European Parliament

Michael

                                                                                        Gahler
Michael Gahler

Member

European Parliament

Christophe

                                                                                        Grudler
Christophe Grudler

Member

European Parliament

Jan

                                                                                        Dietrich

                                                                                        Wörner
Jan Dietrich Wörner

Director General

European Space Agency

Jorge

                                                                                        Domecq
Jorge Domecq

Chief Executive

European Defence Agency

Carlo

                                                                                        des

                                                                                        Dorides
Carlo des Dorides

Executive Director

GSA

Jean-Loic

                                                                                        Galle
Jean-Loic Galle

President

Eurospace

Check the Conference Website for the detailed programme and its regular updates on the invited speakers.
Click to visit the website

* Invited guests subject to the approval of the new College of Commissioners.

By joining this special 12th edition, you will: -participate in high-level debates, -take advantage of the numerous networking opportunities, -benefit from widespread visibility throughout the Conference
 

If you have received a registration code as a guest partner, please enter it to register.
Please note that the registration for the Conference will be closed on 15th January 2020 at midnight.

 
BECOME A PARTNER OF THE EVENT - For more information, please contact: valentin.lupetti@b-bridge.eu - Tel. : +32 (0)2 231 58 50

You don't want our emails? click here

17/08/2019

Démocratie et structure du marché des médias >Les médias ont-ils renoncé à l’information ? Sur les travaux de Julia Cagé

Les «péchés capitaux» duG7

Mitterrand et l'histoire1.pdf

Les médias entre vieux modèles et nouvelles réalités

Les médias ont-ils renoncé à l’information ? Sur les travaux de Julia Cagé

« Journalopes », « merdias », « Lügenpresse », « oligarchie médiatique », « fake news » : pour critiquer un média, force est de constater que le vocabulaire ne manque pas de nos jours. Tout utilisateur de réseaux sociaux y aura été confronté à la lecture des commentaires d’un article ; toute personne vivant en société aura entendu l’un de ces termes fleuris lors d’une discussion.

Les accusations viennent de tous les bords. La gauche et l’extrême-gauche revendiquent une longue tradition de critique des médias. Mais la droite et l’extrême-droite ne sont pas en reste : le terme de « Lügenpresse » (que l’on pourrait traduire par « presse faite de mensonges »), aujourd’hui utilisé par le mouvement de la droite radicale PEGIDA ainsi que par l’AfD allemande, appartient à la novlangue hitlérienne. De nombreux sites de « réinformation » penchant dangereusement à droite fleurissent – on peut citer Breitbart, Égalité & Réconciliation et fdesouche.

Le contenu de ces critiques, on le connaît également : inféodée aux intérêts de la finance cosmopolite, la presse ne serait que le porte-voix d’une classe parasite ; manipulatrice, elle laverait les cerveaux de ses consommateurs ; partielle, elle donnerait de la réalité une image trop radieuse ou trop sombre, trop centrée sur certains sujets. Ces critiques sont aussi anciennes que la presse elle-même ; de nos jours, ces critiques prennent des formes nouvelles – elles insistent sur les méthodes de certaines chaînes d’information en continu, comme BFMTV – mais rejouent également de grands classiques, comme la presse “au service de l’oligarchie néolibérale”.

Ces critiques sont insuffisantes. Elles sont trop souvent un paravent à la mise en pièce de la liberté d’expression. Elles remettent profondément en question le travail et les capacités professionnelles des journalistes qui seraient, au choix, membres même du Grand Complot ou trop intelligents pour s’en rendre compte. Elles sont si vagues qu’elles suffisent à tout : bienheureux celui qui pourrait montrer que « la » presse est néolibérale, « ultralibérale » ou « immigrationniste » !

Faut-il, pour autant, se priver de toute critique des médias ? Non : il y a une manière intelligente et pertinente de penser les médias et d’en faire un portrait critique. C’est la difficile tâche que l’économiste Julia Cagé a entrepris dans ses deux récents ouvrages, Sauver les médias. Capitalisme, financement participatif et démocratie (2015), ainsi que L’information à tout prix (2017), écrit avec deux informaticiens, Nicolas Hervé et Marie-Luce Viaud. Docteure en économie, Julia Cagé travaille essentiellement sur les questions à l’interface des théories de l’information, du développement et de la croissance.

cagé

Source  : MeltingBook

Les médias entre vieux modèles et nouvelles réalités

L’omniprésence des médias est un fait avéré : en France, on compte plus de 4 000 titres de presse, une bonne centaine de radios, plusieurs centaines de chaînes de télévision, sans compter les innombrables blogs et sites web d’information. Et pourtant, les médias sont faibles : leur chiffre d’affaire est bien faible si on le compare à celui d’autres géants de l’information comme Google ; leur portée critique et informative est réduite compte tenu de leur propension à relayer des bribes d’information simplistes et copiées sur d’autres médias (nous reviendrons sur ce point plus tard). Leur crise, illustrée par la fermeture en chaîne de journaux, est patente.

Cette crise trouve ses racines, selon Julia Cagé, dans le statut juridique et la définition même d’un média. En France, depuis la Libération, aucun effort n’a été entrepris pour définir un statut innovant et adapté aux médias. Le statut d’un journal est, aujourd’hui, celui d’une société privée. Cela signifie qu’un média est soumis aux phénomènes de concurrence et peut être acheté – ce qui n’est pas mauvais en soi. Cependant, comme souvent, on se trouve ici dans le cas d’un marché aux caractéristiques bien spécifiques, pour lequel le modèle normatif d’un marché en concurrence pure et parfaite n’est pas adapté.

Pourquoi? Les raisons sont multiples. L’information est un « bien public », c’est à dire non-rival et non-exclusif : une personne qui en consomme ne diminue pas la quantité disponible pour d’autres (non-rivalité) ; il n’est pas possible d’empêcher une personne d’en consommer si elle ne « paye » pas (on parle ici de l’information au sens vaste de la connaissance). De ce fait, il est plus difficile d’inciter un agent à en produire, car il ne peut pas tarifer la consommation de sa production. Elle ne peut être produite exclusivement par l’Etat pour des raisons évidentes, alors que c’est la solution qui est généralement préférée pour des biens de ce type (sécurité, défense nationale, éclairage des rues). Il faut donc trouver des formes intermédiaires, qui transforment inéluctablement la structure du marché (subventions, abonnements, etc.).

L’industrie de la presse présente également des « coûts fixes » très élevés. Deux journaux employant 50 journalistes ne fournissent pas la même information qu’un journal de 100 journalistes : comme chaque journal doit couvrir certains sujets d’actualité générale, on aura, dans le premier cas, des journalistes affectés à cette tâche dans les deux journaux ; l’information est dédoublée, et il reste moins de personnes disponibles pour produire une information originale.

Elle est prise dans une multitude de liens de financement, d’alimentation et de dépendance : les médias ont des statuts divers (fondation, etc.), tirent leurs informations de sources différentes (enquêtes, articles scientifiques, recherche, interviews) et touchent des publics différents (journaux généraux, spécialistes, mensuels, annuels, etc.). En somme, le marché de l’information est trop riche et atypique pour laisser la concurrence agir dans sa forme la plus pure ; l’industrie médiatique est un exemple, parmi d’autres, d’un marché imparfait qui appelle une régulation spécifique. Définir les médias comme des entreprises privées, c’est donc les placer dans un cadre d’exercice qui ne leur convient pas et qui a bien des effets pervers. C’est s’accrocher à un modèle ancien qui ne correspond plus à la réalité contemporaine du travail des médias.

Ainsi, les contraintes financières, qui se sont renforcées avec l’accentuation de la concurrence entre les médias, ont amené les journaux à délaisser le journalisme d’investigation. Le passage au web des journaux s’est souvent fait à ressources égales. D’après le journaliste Eric Scherer, cité par Julia Cagé, les huit mois d’enquête nécessaires au Boston Globe en 2002 pour révéler au grand jour le scandale des abus sexuels du clergé catholique américain ont coûté au journal un million de dollars, sans compter des dizaines de milliers de dollars de frais judiciaires. Difficile de penser qu’aujourd’hui, un média serait prêt à engager de telles sommes pour couvrir une enquête d’investigation, alors qu’il lui est possible de simplement couvrir l’actualité « chaude » et d’y adjoindre quelques petits contenus originaux…

Les médias ont-ils renoncé à l’information ? Sur les travaux de Julia Cagé

« Journalopes », « merdias », « Lügenpresse », « oligarchie médiatique », « fake news » : pour critiquer un média, force est de constater que le vocabulaire ne manque pas de nos jours. Tout utilisateur de réseaux sociaux y aura été confronté à la lecture des commentaires d’un article ; toute personne vivant en société aura entendu l’un de ces termes fleuris lors d’une discussion.

Les accusations viennent de tous les bords. La gauche et l’extrême-gauche revendiquent une longue tradition de critique des médias. Mais la droite et l’extrême-droite ne sont pas en reste : le terme de « Lügenpresse » (que l’on pourrait traduire par « presse faite de mensonges »), aujourd’hui utilisé par le mouvement de la droite radicale PEGIDA ainsi que par l’AfD allemande, appartient à la novlangue hitlérienne. De nombreux sites de « réinformation » penchant dangereusement à droite fleurissent – on peut citer Breitbart, Égalité & Réconciliation et fdesouche.

 

Le contenu de ces critiques, on le connaît également : inféodée aux intérêts de la finance cosmopolite, la presse ne serait que le porte-voix d’une classe parasite ; manipulatrice, elle laverait les cerveaux de ses consommateurs ; partielle, elle donnerait de la réalité une image trop radieuse ou trop sombre, trop centrée sur certains sujets. Ces critiques sont aussi anciennes que la presse elle-même ; de nos jours, ces critiques prennent des formes nouvelles – elles insistent sur les méthodes de certaines chaînes d’information en continu, comme BFMTV – mais rejouent également de grands classiques, comme la presse “au service de l’oligarchie néolibérale”.

Ces critiques sont insuffisantes. Elles sont trop souvent un paravent à la mise en pièce de la liberté d’expression. Elles remettent profondément en question le travail et les capacités professionnelles des journalistes qui seraient, au choix, membres même du Grand Complot ou trop intelligents pour s’en rendre compte. Elles sont si vagues qu’elles suffisent à tout : bienheureux celui qui pourrait montrer que « la » presse est néolibérale, « ultralibérale » ou « immigrationniste » !

Faut-il, pour autant, se priver de toute critique des médias ? Non : il y a une manière intelligente et pertinente de penser les médias et d’en faire un portrait critique. C’est la difficile tâche que l’économiste Julia Cagé a entrepris dans ses deux récents ouvrages, Sauver les médias. Capitalisme, financement participatif et démocratie (2015), ainsi que L’information à tout prix (2017), écrit avec deux informaticiens, Nicolas Hervé et Marie-Luce Viaud. Docteure en économie, Julia Cagé travaille essentiellement sur les questions à l’interface des théories de l’information, du développement et de la croissance.

cagé

Source  : MeltingBook

 

Les médias entre vieux modèles et nouvelles réalités

L’omniprésence des médias est un fait avéré : en France, on compte plus de 4 000 titres de presse, une bonne centaine de radios, plusieurs centaines de chaînes de télévision, sans compter les innombrables blogs et sites web d’information. Et pourtant, les médias sont faibles : leur chiffre d’affaire est bien faible si on le compare à celui d’autres géants de l’information comme Google ; leur portée critique et informative est réduite compte tenu de leur propension à relayer des bribes d’information simplistes et copiées sur d’autres médias (nous reviendrons sur ce point plus tard). Leur crise, illustrée par la fermeture en chaîne de journaux, est patente.

Cette crise trouve ses racines, selon Julia Cagé, dans le statut juridique et la définition même d’un média. En France, depuis la Libération, aucun effort n’a été entrepris pour définir un statut innovant et adapté aux médias. Le statut d’un journal est, aujourd’hui, celui d’une société privée. Cela signifie qu’un média est soumis aux phénomènes de concurrence et peut être acheté – ce qui n’est pas mauvais en soi. Cependant, comme souvent, on se trouve ici dans le cas d’un marché aux caractéristiques bien spécifiques, pour lequel le modèle normatif d’un marché en concurrence pure et parfaite n’est pas adapté.

sauver les médias

Source : Acrimed 

 

Pourquoi? Les raisons sont multiples. L’information est un « bien public », c’est à dire non-rival et non-exclusif : une personne qui en consomme ne diminue pas la quantité disponible pour d’autres (non-rivalité) ; il n’est pas possible d’empêcher une personne d’en consommer si elle ne « paye » pas (on parle ici de l’information au sens vaste de la connaissance). De ce fait, il est plus difficile d’inciter un agent à en produire, car il ne peut pas tarifer la consommation de sa production. Elle ne peut être produite exclusivement par l’Etat pour des raisons évidentes, alors que c’est la solution qui est généralement préférée pour des biens de ce type (sécurité, défense nationale, éclairage des rues). Il faut donc trouver des formes intermédiaires, qui transforment inéluctablement la structure du marché (subventions, abonnements, etc.).

L’industrie de la presse présente également des « coûts fixes » très élevés. Deux journaux employant 50 journalistes ne fournissent pas la même information qu’un journal de 100 journalistes : comme chaque journal doit couvrir certains sujets d’actualité générale, on aura, dans le premier cas, des journalistes affectés à cette tâche dans les deux journaux ; l’information est dédoublée, et il reste moins de personnes disponibles pour produire une information originale.

Elle est prise dans une multitude de liens de financement, d’alimentation et de dépendance : les médias ont des statuts divers (fondation, etc.), tirent leurs informations de sources différentes (enquêtes, articles scientifiques, recherche, interviews) et touchent des publics différents (journaux généraux, spécialistes, mensuels, annuels, etc.). En somme, le marché de l’information est trop riche et atypique pour laisser la concurrence agir dans sa forme la plus pure ; l’industrie médiatique est un exemple, parmi d’autres, d’un marché imparfait qui appelle une régulation spécifique. Définir les médias comme des entreprises privées, c’est donc les placer dans un cadre d’exercice qui ne leur convient pas et qui a bien des effets pervers. C’est s’accrocher à un modèle ancien qui ne correspond plus à la réalité contemporaine du travail des médias.

Ainsi, les contraintes financières, qui se sont renforcées avec l’accentuation de la concurrence entre les médias, ont amené les journaux à délaisser le journalisme d’investigation. Le passage au web des journaux s’est souvent fait à ressources égales. D’après le journaliste Eric Scherer, cité par Julia Cagé, les huit mois d’enquête nécessaires au Boston Globe en 2002 pour révéler au grand jour le scandale des abus sexuels du clergé catholique américain ont coûté au journal un million de dollars, sans compter des dizaines de milliers de dollars de frais judiciaires. Difficile de penser qu’aujourd’hui, un média serait prêt à engager de telles sommes pour couvrir une enquête d’investigation, alors qu’il lui est possible de simplement couvrir l’actualité « chaude » et d’y adjoindre quelques petits contenus originaux…

spotlight.jpg

Les journalistes du film Spotlight, drame sur l’enquête du Boston Globe (2015) 

Source : BlueOcean

 

Et derrière cette baisse de la qualité de l’information se cache bien la baisse massive du nombre de journalistes : il y en a de moins en moins par journal. En raison du problème des coûts fixes énoncé plus haut, on assiste à une surproduction d’information sur l’actualité « chaude » au détriment du journalisme original. Quelques chiffres, cités par Cagé : en 2012, El País licencie 129 de ses 440 journalistes ; en 2013, The Plain Dealer en supprime 50 à Cleveland, The Oregonian 35 à Portland ; plus récemment, Itélé a supprimé 50 postes et La Voix du Nord a annoncé vouloir en supprimer 178. Au niveau agrégé, le nombre de journalistes dans la presse quotidienne aux Etats-Unis est passé de près de 56 000 (2001) à 38 000 (2013) ; en France, le pourcentage de journalistes parmi les cadres et professions intellectuelles supérieures est passé de 1,2% (début des années 1960) à 0,7% (2013). Et ce malgré l’augmentation totale du nombre de journaux.

Comment mesurer la baisse de la qualité de l’information ?

On pourrait cependant voir, dans cette réduction massive des effectifs, un progrès significatif. Moins de journalistes, cela signifie aussi qu’il y a sûrement eu des gains de productivité : chaque journaliste se débrouille pour produire plus d’information de meilleure qualité. Comment montrer, en effet, que la qualité de l’information s’est détériorée ?

Dans son livre L’Information à tout prix, écrit en collaboration avec Nicolas Hervé et Marie-Luce Viaud, Julia Cagé utilise des techniques très fines d’analyse des données pour dresser un portrait de la presse française. Pendant une année entière, les trois chercheurs ont collecté tout le contenu produit par des médias d’information politique et général. Dans l’échantillon, figurent 86 médias d’actualité (59 journaux, 9 télévisions, 7 radios et 10 pure players). Au total, l’analyse porte sur 2 548 634 documents, soit 7000 documents en moyenne par jour. Ils ont ensuite conçu un « détecteur d’événement » : un algorithme utilise le texte, le chapeau et la date de publication de l’article pour grouper les articles similaires.

Pour chaque événement, il a été possible d’identifier le premier média ayant publié un article sur l’événement, le news breaker, et de suivre précisément la diffusion de l’information. Le résultat est net et le constat triple : « les médias vont vite. Ils copient beaucoup. Et ils ne créditent que très peu » (Cagé, Hervé & Viaud).

En découpant la durée de l’événement en 25 intervalles égaux, on constate que 20% des documents relatifs à l’événement sont publiés dans le premier intervalle (soit la première heure, s’il ne dure qu’une journée) : la logique du buzz est ici à l’oeuvre. Cette propagation dépend aussi du média news breaker, les journalistes étant souvent confrontés à un arbitrage entre réactivité et véracité.

L’information se diffuse donc très vite ; de surcroît, elle est peu originale. Le numérique a ici introduit une rupture profonde. Au XIXe siècle, les journaux se battaient pour couvrir une information en premier : ils étaient alors les seuls à la diffuser pendant la journée, et réalisaient un chiffre d’affaire exceptionnel. Aujourd’hui, le copier-coller est devenu la norme. Cagé et ses co-auteurs ont inclus dans leur enquête un algorithme de détection de copie. 73% des documents analysés présentent de la copie externe. Lorsque c’est le news breaker qui est copié, le taux de copie atteint 82% en moyenne (dépêches AFP comprises) : les médias reproduisent dans ce cas quatre cinquièmes de l’article ! La distribution du taux de copie est en fait bimodale : 19% des documents publiés atteignent un taux de copie de près de 100% ; 20% d’entre eux sont entièrement originaux et correspondent aux articles d’investigation.

On assiste donc à une homogénéisation massive des contenus publiés par les médias. Et celle-ci pose des problèmes manifestes de droit : à l’exception du cas spécifique des agences de presse (AFP, Reuters, AP), qui autorise la reproduction intégrale de leurs dépêches par leurs abonnés, la copie est problématique sur le plan légal (sans parler du plan éthique). Cette homogénéisation, couplée à l’augmentation de la vitesse de diffusion de l’information, tue également, comme le souligne Cagé, toute incitation pour les journaux à produire de l’information originale : pourquoi supporter les coûts importants qui y sont associés lorsqu’on peut simplement piller les articles de ses voisins ou copier des dépêches d’une agence de presse ?  

Le point essentiel de la démonstration de Cagé, Hervé et Viaud repose sur une estimation économétrique qui permet de lier tous ces éléments de critique : plus un média a de journalistes, plus il produit d’information originale et moins il copie. C’est donc bien la baisse du nombre de journalistes, liée à la pression budgétaire qui s’exerce sur les médias, qui provoque l’homogénéisation croissante de la production des médias.  

Cette structure de marché est déroutante et offre de nombreux paradoxes à l’économiste attentif. Alors que l’analyse de données par Cagé et ses co-auteurs montre clairement que plus un journal produit de contenu original, plus il attire de lecteurs, peu de journaux choisissent cette ligne stratégique. Bien que les médias soit détenus, in fine, par un nombre réduits de groupes et d’actionnaires, le nombre de publications, de chaînes d’informations est énorme : pourquoi n’y a-t-il pas de concentration sur ce marché ? L’état actuel du marché est-il stable ?     

Démocratie et structure du marché des médias  

Ces évolutions posent des problèmes manifestes en termes de démocratie et de participation politique. Les journaux contribuent ordinairement au développement de l’autonomie politique, en apportant de l’information sur diverses situations ; ils permettent la confrontation de nombreux points de vue ; ils structurent la vie politique de nombreuses régions et pays.

Historiquement, les médias ont fortement contribué à faire émerger une conscience politique. Aussi Julia Cagé et sa co-autrice Valeria Rueda, économiste à Oxford, ont montré que la mise en place de presses par les missionnaires protestants en Afrique subsaharienne ont grandement affecté la vie politique et économique contemporaine des différentes régions. En arrivant, ces colons installent souvent immédiatement des presses pour imprimer des bibles et formalisent les langues locales. Rapidement, ces presses ont aussi servi à imprimer des journaux en langue locale. Grâce à des techniques d’identification, les deux économistes montrent que l’installation d’une pression à proximité d’un endroit lors de la phase de colonisation augmente la taille du lectorat contemporain et favorise le développement économique ainsi que la participation politique de ces régions.

Mais les évolutions de la presse décrites ci-dessus ne favorisent plus le développement de la démocratie. Un autre article de Cagé, basé sur l’étude de la participation politique en France entre 1944 et 2014, suggère ainsi que l’augmentation de la concurrence locale entre médias nuit à la participation politique, car elle amène une baisse de la taille des équipes et donc une baisse de la qualité de l’information diffusée. Un marché local ne semble pouvoir supporter qu’un nombre limité de médias, sans quoi il sature et amène une dégradation de l’information.

Ainsi, c’est paradoxalement l’augmentation du nombre de médias qui renforce leur uniformité. La « pensée unique » – comprise au sens d’uniformisation de l’information diffusée – souvent dénoncée ne vient pas de l’insuffisance du nombre de médias, mais bien de leur surnombre.

Quel avenir pour nos médias ?

Résumons ces critiques en comparant deux archétypes : le travail de deux employés de presse, aujourd’hui et avant la révolution numérique.

Il y a une centaine d’années, un journaliste travaille dans une grande équipe, au sein d’une vaste rédaction. Les concurrents de son journal existent, mais ils sont peu nombreux. Ils se livrent une concurrence acharnée sur le terrain pour couvrir l’information en premier ; notre journaliste est d’ailleurs en lien permanent avec un vaste réseau de correspondants, postés un peu partout sur la planète.  

Aujourd’hui, un journaliste travaille quasiment toujours pour un journal ayant un support internet. Son journal ne se soucie que peu du travail d’investigation ; son travail consiste davantage en la copie d’articles publiés par les news breaker et en la surveillance de Google News. Il est présent et vigilant sur les réseaux sociaux, qui lui permettent de réagir rapidement lorsqu’un nouvel événement se déclenche. Son journal est soumis à une vive pression budgétaire ; son poste est potentiellement menacé. Il travaille en petite équipe.

Des solutions à tous ces problèmes existent déjà. En plus des modifications du statut des journaux longuement suggérées et développées par Julia Cagé dans Sauver les médias, certains journaux mutualisent la production d’information et le travail d’investigation, comme dans le cas de l’enquête des Panama Papers, menée par l’International Consortium for Investigative Journalism. Dans certains pays, des formes alternatives de financement et d’organisation se développent. D’autres médias, comme l’excellent Les Jours, délaissent l’actualité « chaude » pour ne produire que des enquêtes complètement originales sur des sujets d’actualité. On observe aussi au sein de grands journaux un certain “retour à la qualité” à travers des formules d’abonnement, des reportages plus longs et des formats alternatifs.

La situation actuelle du marché de l’information amène naturellement à penser son avenir. Plusieurs pistes se dessinent. Celle, tout d’abord, d’un marché polarisé, pris entre des médias recentrés sur le travail d’enquête et d’investigation qui délaissent l’actualité chaude d’une part, et des médias “on the spot” (chaînes en direct, sites d’info-minute) d’autre part. La nature même d’un média est sûrement appelée à être repensée. De plus en plus de groupes de sociétés intègrent un média au sein de leur stratégie globale de production : au lieu d’être considéré comme une entreprise qui doit maximiser son profit et produire de l’information pour survivre, le média d’un groupe devient un élément du tout produisant une externalité positive sous forme de réputation. Le groupe peut ainsi utiliser la réputation du média par après pour appuyer la diffusion de ses propres produits. Ainsi en va-t-il du groupe Les Echos : si le journal lui-même est en déficit, le groupe a réalisé un excédent. La réputation du journal – sérieux, centré sur les questions économiques et financières, business friendly – est utilisée pour promouvoir d’autres produits et entreprises du groupe. Le récent rachat du dénicheur de start-ups Netexplo par le groupe porte la marque de cette stratégie :  quoi de mieux que la réputation des Échos pour valoriser une entreprise parfaitement en phase avec les modes et narratives actuelles de certains milieux économiques (disruption, entreprenariat, autonomie, innovation) ?   

Ce qu’implique cette dernière transformation reste encore mystérieux. Permettra-t-elle de libérer les médias voulant produire du contenu de qualité de certaines contraintes économiques ? Risque-t-elle, au contraire, de leur nuire en forçant la mise en place d’une ligne éditoriale axée sur les intérêts du groupe ?     

Il reste que des solutions existent donc à la crise actuelle des médias. Elles sont récentes. Et elles sont nécessaires.

Note: la question des médias est éminemment complexe. Nous n’avons pas pu traiter l’ensemble des problématiques liées au sujet, par exemple : la publicité dans les journaux, les paywalls, la propriété des journaux et leur rachat par des actionnaires, la précarisation du métier de journaliste, la question de l’influence des médias sur les choix politiques ou encore les formes alternatives d’organisation des journaux comme les sociétés coopératives. Nous ne cherchons pas à occulter leur existence et encourageons les lecteurs curieux à lire notamment Sauver les Médias et L’Information à tout prix, qui prolongent de nombreuses pistes initiées ici.  

Linus Bleistein, pour Economens

Sources

Julia Cagé, Sauver les médias. Capitalisme, financement participatif et démocratie, éd. Seuil, 2015

Julia Cagé, Nicolas Hervé et Marie-Luce Viaud, L’information à tout prix, éd. INA, 2017

Julia Cagé, « Media Competition, Information Provision and Political Participation : Evidence from French Local Newspapers, 1944 – 2014 », CEPR Discussion Paper, 2017

Julia Cagé & Valeria Rueda, « The Long Terme Effects of the Printing Press in sub-saharian Africa », AEJ : Applied Economics, 2016

Julia Cagé & Valeria Rueda, « The Devil is the Detail : Christian Missions’ Heterogeneous Effects on Development in sub-Saharan Africa », voxeu.org, 2017

Dominique Pinsolle, « Critique des médias : une histoire impétueuse », Le Monde Diplomatique, avril 2016

Eric Scherer, A-t-on encore besoin de journalistes ? Manifeste pour un « journalisme augmenté », PUF, 2011  

 
Toute l'info avec 20minutes.fr, l'actualité en temps réel Toute l'info avec 20minutes.fr : l'actualité en temps réel | tout le sport : analyses, résultats et matchs en direct
high-tech | arts & stars : toute l'actu people | l'actu en images | La une des lecteurs : votre blog fait l'actu